ghee

Is Ghee Paleo?

More specifically, why is this edible amazing?

I didn’t grow up exposed to a lot of foods that you might consider to be traditionally non-American. (Whatever that means, but you get the idea.)

Ghee is certainly such a food.

In fact, when I first read about it, I didn’t even know how to pronounce it. Gee? Jee?

I had no idea, except the vague understanding that people seem to spread it on things.

What Is Ghee?

Turns out that this ingredient is, in some sense, butter. But it’s not butter in the way most Americans are used to it.

Ghee is a type of clarified butter. That means that this soft solid is what you get when you take butter, evaporate the water out of it, and then filter (or “clarify”) it to remove the milk solids. (For ghee—as opposed to other clarified butter—the milk solids are also simmered with the fat to create a caramel and nutty flavor.)

The result is a nuttier, clearer-looking version of butter that is very stable at room temperature. Yes, this food has been around for a long time—in India, it’s commonly used for cooking and also medicinally, and it has been used for thousands of years.

Is Ghee Healthy?

Recent studies into ghee are still few in number, but they’re growing by the day. What scientists have discovered so far is that it does decrease the risk of cardiovascular disease; antioxidants present in the ghee are a big part of this healing effect, as they help protect the body against oxidative stresses. In fact, scientists are beginning to discover an inverse correlation between this type of butter and heart disease—those who eat more of this type of butter tend to be less likely to suffer from coronary heart disease. On top of that, consumption of it does not alter your body’s serum levels. Because of this, researchers have claimed that this butter is a beneficial addition to the diet.

However, many people are worried about the saturated fat content present in this food, and they say it should only be consumed in moderation because it does not contain many of the nutrients present in actual butter. Paleo experts can sometimes be torn on whether or not to use ghee, but there does seem to be an overall consensus.

What Do Other Paleo Experts Say?

The Whole9 Team says: “The only way we can recommend eating butter is if it comes from a humanely raised, grass-fed, organic source, and you take the time to clarify it. There are no major downsides to butter produced in such a manner, and we can happily recommend you use your clarified butter or ghee as one of your (varied) added fat sources. (Just so you know, ghee and clarified butter are similar but not identical; ghee is heated longer, until the milk solids brown. That imparts a richer, smokier flavor into the butterfat.)”

Mark Sisson says: “Animal fat has been unjustly demonized and there’s a lot of misinformation out there. Make sure the ghee you buy comes from pure butter, and butter alone; some brands combine vegetable oil with butter to make their ghee.”

So Is Ghee Paleo?

Yes!

This is a great thing to add to a Paleo lifestyle. Try tossing your veggies in it! As Paleo experts have warned, though, be careful to get your ghee from a reputable source to ensure that it isn’t mixed with vegetable oil. You want nothing but pure butter in there! Making ghee at home is a great way to save some money, too.

Issue No. 40

Grass Fed Butter Vs. Ghee 

Butter photoBoth grass fed butter and ghee have been the highlight of many paleo controversies. There have been so many questions revolving around the two; which one is better, which one is healthier, or even, which one is more paleo? I may not have the answers to all of the questions, but I do have the facts on grass-fed butter vs. ghee. This topic can easily become a bit confusing considering they are both technically dairy and very much not on the list of paleo recommended foods.

What is Ghee?

You may have heard ghee called by many different names, such as clarified butter. Though many people believe that they are the exact thing, that only holds a slight bit of truth. Clarified butter is more of a stage in the processes of making ghee. Ghee, however, has to be cooked past the point of clarification. This not only helps it reach the point of becoming ghee, it also imparts a nutty flavor, similar to that of browned butter. Ghee is made by heating butter at a low temperature until all of the water cooks off and all of the proteins coagulate at the bottom of the pan. The ghee is then poured off and strained; once it has cooled it will begin to solidify.

While ghee can be a slight bit time consuming to make; but if you aren’t up for the task, you can easily purchase it in most any grocery store. However, if you do decide to make it on your own, be sure to use butter from grass-fed cows.

What is Grass Fed Butter?

Grass-fed butter is much simpler than ghee; the title pretty much says it all. Grass-fed butter is made from dairy from, you guessed it, grass-fed cows. That being said, butter from grass-fed cows is a huge source of heart-healthy nutrients. Butter is made up of approximately 400 different fatty acids and soluble vitamins. Of the hundreds of different fatty acids found in butter, many of them have potent biological activity. Grass-fed butter contains five times more conjugated linoleic acid than butter that is made from grain fed cows. Overall, Grass-fed butter is believed to be much healthier; which is why many people on the paleo lifestyle choose it as their fat of choice.

Which one is better?

While there really is no clear winner, it really comes down to a matter of personal choice. As with everything, there are pros and cons to both choices. Ghee, too many people, is the more paleo options because the dairy and fat protein has been removed. On the other hand, grass-fed butter has been shown to have many health benefits. If you choose to keep butter in your Paleo diet, both of these options are at the top of the list of recommended choices and are both packed with health benefits and flavor.